Editorial: Waiting on the delivery drone
by The Anniston Star Editorial Board
Dec 03, 2013 | 1204 views |  0 comments | 27 27 recommendations | email to a friend | print
This undated image provided by Amazon.com shows the so-called Prime Air unmanned aircraft project that Amazon is working on in its research and development labs. Amazon says it will take years to advance the technology and for the Federal Aviation Administration to create the necessary rules and regulations, but CEO Jeff Bezos said Sunday Dec. 1, 2013,  there's no reason Drones can't help get goods to customers in 30 minutes or less. Photo: Amazon/The Associated Press
This undated image provided by Amazon.com shows the so-called Prime Air unmanned aircraft project that Amazon is working on in its research and development labs. Amazon says it will take years to advance the technology and for the Federal Aviation Administration to create the necessary rules and regulations, but CEO Jeff Bezos said Sunday Dec. 1, 2013, there's no reason Drones can't help get goods to customers in 30 minutes or less. Photo: Amazon/The Associated Press
slideshow
In Harry Potter’s world, owls are the delivery vehicle of choice for letters and other parcels. Harry’s is named Hedwig, and in the book and movie series he is both a reliable postal carrier and companion to the young wizard.

When the situation is most bleak for Katniss Everdeen during the Hunger Games, aid in the form of food or medicine gently floats down from the sky to assist this heroine of the book and movie franchise.

In the world of Amazon.com CEO Jeff Bezos, small drones may someday deliver all your favorite stuff right to your front door in less than an hour.

Bezos expounded on his vision while speaking Sunday on the CBS program 60 Minutes.

The basics would work like this:

A customer orders something from Amazon.

Assuming the customer is within range (about 10 miles) and her order weighs less than five pounds, a drone known as an “octocopter” delivers a pair of socks or a favorite snack or whatever in about 30 minutes.

Bezos says he’d like to see Amazon Prime Air in operation before the end of the decade.

Others, including futurists and tech experts, chortle in response. Policies concerning unmanned aircraft don’t allow drone deliveries. Battery power to make a delivery and return to a warehouse isn’t quite there yet. Bad weather could ground the octocopter. And so on.

No one should wave off these concerns. Yet, the entrepreneurial spirit is in play here, and that can never be grounded.
Comments must be made through Facebook
No personal attacks
No name-calling
No offensive language
Comments must stay on topic
No infringement of copyrighted material


Friends to Follow



Most Recommended

Editorial: Waiting on the delivery drone by The Anniston Star Editorial Board

Today's Events

event calendar

post a new event

Sunday, April 20, 2014

Marketplace