HOT BLAST: Hard times in rural parts of U.S.
Nov 13, 2013 | 888 views |  0 comments | 20 20 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Three combines harvest the winter wheat on the Cooksey farm near Roggen, Colo.(AP Photo/Ed Andrieski, File)

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Three combines harvest the winter wheat on the Cooksey farm near Roggen, Colo.(AP Photo/Ed Andrieski, File) Read more: Anniston Star - Local News, Business, Sports, Events, Blogs, Videos, Podcasts
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The real loser of the recession is rural America is the headline for a Wonkblog post by Lydia DePillis. Here's the bad news:

[T]he rural areas that are being left behind.

Last week, the U.S. Department of Agriculture released its annual survey of rural America, which puts the divergence in stark relief. Non-metropolitan areas experienced their first recorded period of population loss, and a decline in the labor force participation rate pushed unemployment down slightly (though the jobless rate surpassed the urban unemployment rate earlier this year). But even as the rest of the country entered a tepid recovery, and some rural areas gained jobs from the natural gas boom, net employment didn't budge rural regions.

The article is based on this U.S. Dept. of Agriculture report:

High-poverty counties (with a poverty rate of 20 percent or higher) are often geographically clustered. Of 703 high-poverty counties in the United States in 2007-11, 571 were nonmetro, mostly in the South and Southwest. Most high-poverty counties are in or near Native American reservations or in areas with high concentrations of Blacks or Hispanics. Most predominantly White counties with high poverty rates are in Appalachia.

 

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