HOT BLAST: The Snowden lessons
Jul 02, 2013 | 1699 views |  0 comments | 86 86 recommendations | email to a friend | print
An Edward Snowden supporter holds a poster outside Sheremetyevo Airport in Moscow on Friday. The poster reads: "Russia is for Snowden!" (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)
An Edward Snowden supporter holds a poster outside Sheremetyevo Airport in Moscow on Friday. The poster reads: "Russia is for Snowden!" (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)
slideshow
NSA secrets leaker Edward Snowden has hit upon hard times. Stuck in a Russian airport, he's not yet found a nation that will grant him asylum.

There are some interesting takes on the NSA/Snowden saga this week.

Writing for Foreign Policy, Daniel W. Drezner has a theory on Snowden hasn't found a home:

"States will war with one another, spy on one another, foment revolution across borders, and what-not.  They are pretty reluctant, however to empower actors that can then use that power to try and erode the principal of the state as the ne plus ultra of governing authority.  This is why countries like Iran and Russia cooperated with the United States during crucial periods of the 2001 invasion of Afghanistan and the ensuing war on terror.  When states see a threat to the Westphalian order that's been around for a few centuries, they will act in concert to repel it."  

Meanwhile at New York magazine, Frank Rich has a theory on why the NSA revelations have fizzled out with much of the public:

"The truth is that privacy jumped the shark in America long ago. Many of us not only don’t care about having our privacy invaded but surrender more and more of our personal data, family secrets, and intimate yearnings with open eyes and full hearts to anyone who asks and many who don’t, from the servers of Fortune 500 corporations to the casting directors of reality-television shows to our 1.1 billion potential friends on Facebook." 

Oh, and one more. Jonathan Chait compares Glenn Greenwald, the journalist who introduced Snowden and his secrets to the world, to Ralph Nader:


"Greenwald, like Nader, marries an indefatigable mastery of detail with fierce moralism. Every issue he examines has a good side and an evil side."

 
Comments must be made through Facebook
No personal attacks
No name-calling
No offensive language
Comments must stay on topic
No infringement of copyrighted material


Friends to Follow



Most Recommended
Today's Events

event calendar

post a new event

Saturday, April 19, 2014

Marketplace