HOT BLAST: Tragic use of chemical weapons, then and now
Aug 26, 2013 | 1610 views |  0 comments | 20 20 recommendations | email to a friend | print
U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry had strong words for Syria concerning its almost certain use of chemical weapons:

"The indiscriminate slaughter of civilians, the killing of women and children and innocent bystanders by chemical weapons is a moral obscenity. By any standard, it is inexcusable and — despite the excuses and equivocations that some have manufactured — it is undeniable."

True.

However, Foreign Policy provides valuable (as well as breathtakingly awful) context to this story:

The U.S. government may be considering military action in response to chemical strikes near Damascus. But a generation ago, America's military and intelligence communities knew about and did nothing to stop a series of nerve gas attacks far more devastating than anything Syria has seen, Foreign Policy has learned.

In 1988, during the waning days of Iraq's war with Iran, the United States learned through satellite imagery that Iran was about to gain a major strategic advantage by exploiting a hole in Iraqi defenses. U.S. intelligence officials conveyed the location of the Iranian troops to Iraq, fully aware that Hussein's military would attack with chemical weapons, including sarin, a lethal nerve agent. 
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