HOT BLAST: The sunset for what was once a must-have mobile device?
Sep 27, 2013 | 1471 views |  0 comments | 20 20 recommendations | email to a friend | print
BlackBerry employees prepare the launch event for the company's new smartphones in London, earlier this year. This week Fairfax Financial Holdings Ltd. said it intended to purchase BlackBerry in a deal worth $4.7 billion. (AP Photo/Lefteris Pitarakis, File)
BlackBerry employees prepare the launch event for the company's new smartphones in London, earlier this year. This week Fairfax Financial Holdings Ltd. said it intended to purchase BlackBerry in a deal worth $4.7 billion. (AP Photo/Lefteris Pitarakis, File)
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Jeffrey Toobin's book on the 2000 presidential election Florida recount - Too Close to Call - makes an interesting comparison between the two candidates.

Of Al Gore, Toobin writes:

For sending e-mail, Gore used his BlackBerry, which allows user to type out messages with their thumbs. Because the vice president had one, the small, wireless device became a fashionable accessory during the campaign, even though most people had trouble with the awkward typing mechanism. Unlike everyone else, the meticulous vice president seemed never to make a spelling error on his. On one level, Gore's proficiency amazed his subordinates, but at the same time, it contributed to the distance between the vice president and the people around him. His fastidiousness was just a little ... weird.

Of George W. Bush, Toobin writes:

"I don't want to be seen with two cell phone and a BlackBerry telling people what to do," Bush told an adviser."

That, in the history of the rise of the BlackBerry, was then. For fans of the mobile device, now is far different.

NPR's Morning Edition Friday featured an ode to the BlackBerry, which has hit hard times of late

Anyone with a connected device can tap into the world's store of information. Anyone who can type or take a picture can now add to a global debate — and BlackBerry helped get it all started. For millions of people in the developing world, a BlackBerry was the way they first experienced the Internet.

BlackBerry may still live on as a smaller private company, but its era is ending.

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